Every Neuron is Special

A couple of weeks ago I presented

A category-free neural population supports evolving demands during decision-making

by David Raposo, Matthew Kaufman and Anne Churchland.  By “categories” they are referring to some population of cells whose responses during an experiment seem to be dominated by one or two of the experimental variables. The authors refer to these types of categories as functional categories.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Subunit models for characterizing responses of sensory neurons

On July 28th, I presented the following paper in lab meeting:

This paper proposes a new method for characterizing the multi-dimensional stimulus selectivity of sensory neurons. The main idea is that, instead of thinking of neurons as projecting high-dimensional stimuli into an arbitrary low-dimensional feature space (the view underlying characterization methods like STA, STC, iSTAC, GQM, MID, and all their rosy-cheeked cousins), it might be more useful / parsimonious to think of neurons as performing a projection onto convolutional subunits. That is, rather than characterizing stimulus selectivity in terms of a bank of arbitrary linear filters, it might be better to consider a subspace defined by translated copies of a single linear filter.

Continue reading

Lab Meeting 3/25/2013: Demixing PCA (dPCA)

If you had lots of spike trains over 4 seconds for 800 neurons, 6 stimulus conditions, and 2 behavioral choices, how would you visualize your data? Unsupervised dimensionality reduction techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA) finds orthonormal basis vectors that captures the most variance of the data, but the results are not necessarily interpretable. What one wants is to say is something like:

“Along this direction, the population dynamics seems to encode stimulus, and along this other orthogonal dimension, neurons are modulated by the motor behavior…”

Continue reading